Things to do in Tallinn and Estonia

Where can one dispose old batteries?

Answers:

  • The law provides that all the manufactures of batteries will be required to redeem used batteries via points of sale, and supply marketers for suitable collection containers for that purpose. Therefore, all points of sale that offer batteries (shops, kiosks etc.) must collect used batteries, free of any charges, regardless of whether new batteries are purchased or not. Respective information must be displayed in a visible place at points of sale.
  • Maxima at Keskturg has a container next to the self-checkout
  • You can find a box for used batteries in any stores like prisma rimi slaver ect. Its usually located by the information desk
  • Koduekstra
  • I saw boxes in Prisma near info
  • Every grocery store has a disposal box

Can you recommend a second-hand shop?

Answers:

Can you suggest organizations that help refugees and need volunteers?

Answers:

  • Eesti Pagulasabi is one of the most known organisations. Their website is up here:  pagulasabi.ee – unfortunately only in Estonian. As I read they are open to any collaboration and searching different professionals to help with the integration, so to be Estonian or to know a good level of Estonian is just relevant for the teaching position. Accompanying refugees and helping is open to everyone.
  • There’s also Johannes Mihkelsoni Keskus in Tartu.
  • Story Tallinn organizes events.

How did you transport your belongings from the USA to Estonia?

Answers:

  • Im not American though, but you need to hire a cargo (packers and movers), who will deal with overseas cargos. As you are moving household goods it’s very straightforward procedure. The company packs everything for you and all the boxes needs to be labelled and they need to know the content of the box. Moving household goods you do not pay any tax only the transportation fee.
  • I would advise to check all electrical appliances and devices for compatibility with EU voltage and frequency. Month ago here was a person selling stuff, which he brought from states, but it doesn’t work here.
  • We just moved to Tallinn from Florida. I called a few companies and the procedure they indicated was either they come to you and figure out a quote based on what you’re bringing, or if it’s all packed then you can give them numbers of items/boxes and weights. We didn’t move any furniture or household items so didn’t go with that option, but the estimates where all free so you won’t have anything to lose to call.
  • Before choosing a moving company, Google them and find some candid reviews from customers. We were just minutes away from committing to one company – giving them thousands of dollars and everything in our household – when I thought to check them out online. Their customers had the bitterest experiences: damaged goods and delivery that was often *months* late.
  • It is pretty easy to find a furnished apartment in Estonia and as mentioned, the voltage for appliances is different, so think about what you really need to ship. We brought only our clothes and some important books/toys and we were able to bring it all by plane.
  • We did the same and just got a furnished apartment a couple weeks ago. We actually only saw a couple unfurnished apartments offered though I am sure you can get them.

Where do you donate your clothes?

Answers:

  • Humana – humanae.ee
  • I take mine to EELK Harkujarve Kogudus. Humana, in my opinion, does not deliver them to anybody, but is a network of shops.
  • Humana doesn’t accept donations anymore. Sõbralt Sõbrale, Uuskasutuskeskus shops, Emma shop on Mulla street do. And there are those red big containers here and there, it’s also meant for giveaway clothes.